Saturday, January 20, 2007

LCA 2007 My Day 3

Yesterday was the last day of linux conf au. As usual it was the mad rush from work to get to my first session, at least this time I wasn't late. The session was Robert McQueen's "Telepathy - Unifying IM, Voice and Video Communications". This was very interesting and after seeing the video demo using a Nokia N800, apart from wanting one, I will be keeping an eye of this project.

The next was Andre Pang's "Erlang and Concurrency" talk. Andre is an excellent and entertaining speaker. This talk investigated everyone's dislike or fear of threading, and then explained the advantages of Erlang's message passing distributed model. Every year I try to learn a new language, maybe it will be Erlang this year or maybe I should just look at Stackless Python.

After lunch, it was Rob Collins, Erik de Castro Lopo, and Peter Miller's "Do it our way" presentation. After attending their tutorial on Thursday, I was looking forward to this talk to hear about the other testing patterns they feel we should be using. Learnt a little bit more and looking forward to the release of the paper. They also intend to create a website to allow sharing of these testing patterns.

The last session I attended was Valerie Henson's "Choosing and Tuning Linux File Systems". Picked up a couple of interesting things, but the main take home of the talk was "use ext3 unless you know you need something else".

The day for me ended with the closing ceremony. Two of the conference attendee's went home with a olpc after being selected based on their submissions for a olpc software project proposal. Others who submitted a proposal were told not too cry as it was likely that a olpc was coming there way as well. I intend to have a play with the olpc emulation soon.

Thanks to the 7 team for a great conference and to all those who took the time to discuss OSS stuff with me.

1 comment:

Nicola Larosa said...

> Every year I try to learn a new language, maybe
> it will be Erlang this year or maybe
> I should just look at Stackless Python.

Or look at Twisted.

Start here:

Asynchronous Programming with Twisted.